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THE RE-INTERPRETION OF OBJECTS IN A TRANSREGIONAL EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVE
CHAPTER 1: THE CONCEPT AND GOALS OF THE EMEE-PROJECT CHAPTER 5 CHAPTER 4 CHAPTER 3 CHAPTER 2 CHAPTER 1
There are various ways to identify the transregional and cross-cultural dimensions of museum objects. In the following, the most productive of them are outlined in a more or less systematic way, but in their applica- tion to a speci c object they may however overlap.1
THE OBJECT AS ‘MIGRANT’
Regarding museums of city or regional history, which predominantly exhib- it objects from the regional vicinity, the question concerning provenance from a transregional point of view may appear less productive. By taking a closer look, however, it often becomes apparent that in their history such objects indeed show transregional and/or transcultural references when, for instance, they were produced elsewhere and subsequently sold and re-sold once or twice before they ended up in the respective museum.
Even though in museums of local and regional history such tran- sregional aspects are discernible only for speci c objects and groups of objects, the following basically applies to all museum objects regardless of their being exhibited or not: they all have a ‘history of migration’, which leads them from their place of origin – perhaps covering vast distances with manifold stops – to their position in a speci c museum. Their ‘story of migration’ may perhaps be as exciting as a person's life story and open up further perspectives of transregional and/or transcultural questions.
1 Cf. Fuhrmann, A.-L., Schumann, J., Popp, S., Schilling, S. and Mayer-Simmet, O. (2016), Making Europe Visible. Re- interpretation of Museum Objects and Topics. A Manual (EMEE Toolkit series, vol. 1), Vienna: edition mono/monochrom, available online: http://www.museums-exhibiting-europe. de/download/8248/, Accessed 11 August 2016.
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